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Why did Google refuse your right to be forgotten request

Why did Google refuse your right to be forgotten request

Google denies your Right to be forgotten request but admits it may be wrong

Your right to be forgotten application might be refused because Google sometimes passes judgment over the moral or social choices and past errors you might have made.

Why did Google refuse your right to be forgotten request

How to overturn Google's refusal to a right to be forgotten request

Example of a right to be forgotten request involving a criminal record

Newspapers articles and the right to be forgotten decision

Inaccurate court reporting and right to be forgotten

Trying to remove articles from Google searches

How to get rid of online reports of your criminal record

How to overturn a refusal of a right to be forgotten application

What are the legal grounds for challenging Google's refusal to remove articles from searches

Solicitor’s thoughts about the case

Why did Google refuse your right to be forgotten request

Google might have refused your right to be forgotten request for legal, social or moral grounds. The right to be forgotten is a right under European Union law to have your personal data removed from search engines. The law is also known as the EU Data Protection Directive. The right to be forgotten has been in the news lately because Google has been refusing some legitimate requests for data removal. Google has been accused of passing judgment on the moral or social choices of its users. For example, Google has refused to remove an article from its search results that accused a man of having an affair.

The man had filed a request under the right to be forgotten, but Google refused the request. Google has also been accused of passing judgment on the past errors of its users. For example, Google has refused to remove an article from its search results that accused a man of being a convicted criminal. The man had filed a request under the right to be forgotten, but Google refused the right to be forgotten request.

The right to be forgotten is a complicated issue. It's vital to seek legal assistance when seeking the deletion or removal of your personal information from a search engine. While Google and other search engines are obligated to remove requested information, retaining the information for any reason is legally questionable.

Google Right to Be Forgotten Legal Advice FAQ

Google might refuse a right to be forgotten request for several reasons, including legal, social, or moral grounds. This might happen if Google deems the information in question relevant to the public interest or considers the removal to potentially infringe on freedom of expression. For instance, Google has refused requests to remove articles accusing individuals of having affairs or being convicted criminals, basing its decisions on the balance of individual privacy rights against public interest.

Challenging Google's refusal involves perseverance and a professional approach. Initially, you could make a more detailed submission to Google, outlining why the information should be removed. If this doesn't work, you might consider appealing to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) or taking legal action. It's crucial to present a strong case that balances your right to privacy against the public interest in accessing the information.

Yes, news articles about past crimes can sometimes be removed under the right to be forgotten, especially if the conviction is spent or if the continued availability of the articles disproportionately impacts the individual's life. Success in such cases often requires proving that the information is no longer relevant or that it causes undue harm to the individual's reputation and personal life.

When assessing a right to be forgotten request, Google considers various factors, including the relevance of the information to the individual's professional life, the public interest in accessing the information, and the individual's right to privacy. Google also weighs the potential harm to the individual against the societal value of the information being publicly available.

Legal grounds for challenging Google's refusal include arguing that the processing of personal data is not fair, lawful, or for a legitimate purpose as required by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This might involve demonstrating that the information is no longer relevant, that it causes undue harm, or that its continued availability infringes on the individual's privacy rights. A comprehensive GDPR Notice can be an effective tool in such challenges, especially when it clearly outlines the reasons why the information should be considered for removal.

How to overturn Google's refusal to a right to be forgotten request

Yes, you can overturn Google's refusal of a right to be forgotten request and before you make an appeal to the ICO or take Google to court, you should consider persevering with your requests to Google and making a professional submission for Google to reconsider the refusal of your right to be forgotten request.

Example of a right to be forgotten request involving a criminal record

Our client was convicted of operating a brothel in 2014 and has been trying to remove news articles about his conviction from Google searches ever since. He contacted us because he was fed up with the negative articles appearing when you searched for his name. We were able to help him by removing the articles from Google searches and improving his online reputation. He was very happy with the results and is now able to move on with his life.

Newspapers articles and the right to be forgotten decision

The young man stood in front of the judge, head bowed in shame. He knew what was coming, and he deserved it. He had pleaded guilty to the offence, and now he was facing the consequences. The judge sentenced him to a suspended prison sentence of 6 months and 300 hours of community service.

It seemed that the judge did not feel that the circumstances of the offence were serious enough to send him to jail. The young man was relieved and vowed to never put himself in that position again. He would complete his community service and learn from his mistakes.

This was a turning point in his life, and he was determined to make the most of it. However, the newspapers had a field day with the story, painting it as far more serious than it actually was. In reality, the man had only been convicted of a minor offence and was given a light sentence. His friends and family stood by him and the story quickly died down.

Inaccurate court reporting and right to be forgotten

Despite the fact that the sensationalised news story died down, it remained on the internet, and this has been causing our client serious issues since then. The story in question related to an incident in which our client was involved, and while the details were not entirely accurate, the overall narrative was damaging to our client's reputation.

Our client has been struggling to find work and has had to move because of the negative attention they have received since the story was published. He tried to get the story removed from the internet, but it has been a difficult and costly process.

Trying to remove articles from Google searches

Our client had been trying to contact Google for months, ever since the news articles about his past had started appearing in search results. He had begged and pleaded with them to delist the articles, but Google had declined his request. He didn't know what else to do.

The articles were ruining his life. He had lost his job and his family because of them. He was a pariah. Every time he tried to start over, the articles would show up and ruin everything. He was at the end of his rope. He had even considered suicide, but he just couldn't do it. He had to find a way to get rid of the articles.

He was desperate. He also paid a great deal of money to so-called reputation management companies who promised to push the news articles about his conviction down the search results. It seemed to work for a while, but eventually, the articles began to resurface. He tried to ignore them, but they were a constant reminder of his past. He began to feel like he was living in a prison of his own making.

How to get rid of online reports of your criminal record

As a young man, our client had made some mistakes. Nothing too serious, but enough to get him a criminal record and to be embarrassed about what he did. He had thought that, over time, his record would become less and less visible. Eventually, it would all but disappear. But that's not what happened. The internet has made it possible for anyone and everyone to see his criminal record. It's there for anyone who wants to look it up. And it's been haunting him for years. He's tried everything he can think of to get rid of it. But it's always there, just a click away.

At one point he came across our law firm and with the little hope he still had, he asked us to try and have the news articles about his convictions removed from the internet for good. We told him it would be a long and difficult process, but we would do our best.

How to overturn a refusal of a right to be forgotten application

The case took nearly two years to complete. Our first right to be forgotten request to Google was rejected. Google said that having assessed the balance of relevant rights and interests relating to the content in question, including factors such as its relevance to our client's professional life, the public interest in having access to the information, and the client's right to privacy, they had decided to reject the request.

However, after a lengthy legal battle, we finally managed to get the ruling overturned, and the information was removed from Google's search results. Our client was extremely relieved and grateful to us for our hard work in getting the result they wanted.

What are the legal grounds for challenging Google's refusal to remove articles from searches

In our client’s case, we served a comprehensive General Data Protection Regulation ("GDPR") Notice objecting to the publication of the articles on Google. The GDPR requires that personal data be processed fairly and lawfully and that it be collected for specified, explicit and legitimate purposes.

Our GDPR Notice to Google objected to the publication of the articles on the basis that they comprise our clients' personal data, and that the processing of that data by Google is not fair, lawful or for a legitimate purpose. The Notice requested that Google remove the articles from its search results and take steps to ensure that they are not republished. Factors that were relevant to the right to be forgotten request were that our client had a previous criminal conviction that had been spent for more than 5 years, and that the information was no longer relevant to their current life.

The client had also taken steps to rehabilitate themselves and were now a law-abiding citizen. Other factors that were relevant to the right to be forgotten request were that our client had two young children and that he was no longer working as an accountant. Our client felt that the information that was being shared about him was no longer accurate and could potentially damage his reputation. We argued that the negative psychological impact of the news articles about his conviction remaining online was a factor that Google had to take into account when considering his right to be forgotten request.

This is because the right to be forgotten is not only about protecting an individual's privacy but also about ensuring that they are not unfairly stigmatized by information that is readily available online. In this case, the fact that the news articles in question are still easily accessible through a simple Google search could be seen as unfairly stigmatizing the individual concerned.

After initially refusing to remove news articles about our client's conviction from Google searches, our law firm continued to press Google on the issue. After four rounds of communications, Google finally conceded and agreed to delist the articles. This was a major victory for our client, who had been struggling to move on from his past and rebuild his life.

Solicitor’s thoughts about the case

The right to be forgotten gives individuals the right to have their personal data erased under certain circumstances. Our main challenge in this right to be forgotten case was to provide evidence to Google that the news articles in question were no longer in the public interest and should therefore be removed from Google searches for our client's name. We gathered all of the necessary evidence and presented it to Google in a clear and concise manner. Google agreed with our assessment and removed the articles from their search results.

Our client can now rest assured knowing that their personal data has been erased and is no longer publicly available. This was a difficult but important case, and we are pleased that we were able to help our client get the justice he deserved. The internet never forgets. Once something is out there, it's there forever. That's why the right to be forgotten is so important. If you have something in your past that you don't want anyone to know about, it can be very difficult to get rid of it.

That's where we come in. We help people remove old, embarrassing, or damaging information from Google searches. It's not an easy process, but it is possible. In this particular case, our main challenge was to provide evidence to Google that the news articles in question were no longer in the public interest and should therefore be removed from Google searches for our client's name.

We gathered all of the necessary evidence and presented it to Google. After a long and difficult process, we were finally able to get the articles removed from Google searches. If you're in a similar situation, don't despair. We can help you too.

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